Transparency and Accountability

Photo credit: riotcitygirl/flickr

For NATO to live up the reason for which it was created—to safeguard the freedom, common heritage and civilisation of their peoples, founded on the principles of democracy, individual liberty and the rule of law (North Atlantic Treaty, 1949)—it must be open, transparent and accountable to the public. Yet NATO is the only major intergovernmental body not to have even a basic information disclosure policy and the Alliance continues to be a closed and secretive organisation distant from the general public. Most of the Alliance’s work takes place away from the glare of publicity in an assortment of projects involving over 400 specialised agencies, centres, committees, groups and panels. Mechanisms for parliamentary and public accountability and oversight are inadequate or non-existent. This is a summary list of all the content in the site categorised within the Transparency & Accountability policy area.

8th
Feb
2011

An assessment of Wikileaks NATO-related US cables

Original publication date: 
Tue, 02/08/2011 (All day)

8th
Dec
2010

Wikileaks: Access US cables with ‘NATO’ tag

Wikileaks is releasing classified United States diplomatic cables sent to and from US embassies in countries throughout the world.

7th
Dec
2010

Wikileaks reveal Article 5 contingency plans to defend Baltics and Poland

The latest selected release of confidential US diplomatic cables (from late 2008 to the end of 2009) are the first to directly address sensitive negotiations within NATO.

26th
Nov
2010

NATO Reform Lite: An Evaluation of the Lisbon Summit (Part I)

Original publication date: 
Fri, 11/26/2010 (All day)


  • New Alliance blueprint oversold as a transformation – NATO 3.0 – when much of it is a slow-cooking evolution

2nd
Sep
2010

Three Bold and Innovative Ideas for NATO

Original publication date: 
Sun, 08/29/2010 (All day)

Ian Davis, Atlantic-Community.org

 

27th
Aug
2010

Publish or be leaked?

Recording civilian casualties in conflict