Counter Terrorism

Photo credit: neonbubble/flickr

Research by the RAND Corporation into the case histories of 648 terrorist organisations that carried out attacks between 1968 and 2006 found that only 7 percent were successfully eliminated through direct military force. This is in contrast to 43 percent who dropped their violent activities after some form of political accommodation and 40 percent who were broken up successfully through some combination of local community policing, infiltration, and prosecution. NATO counter-terrorism policy should focus on international cooperation to improve the intelligence base, strengthen civilian law enforcement capabilities, restrict terrorist access to funds and weapons, and reduce the root causes driving people to radical violence. Specialised counter-terrorism forces should have clearly defined doctrines, rules of deployment and engagement, and effective parliamentary oversight. This is a summary list of all the content in the site categorised within the Counter-Terrorism policy area.

18th
Jun
2012

Networks of Special Forces worldwide

By Nigel Chamberlain, NATO Watch

26th
Apr
2012

NATO Chiefs of Defence meeting

 

NATO HQ, Brussels, 25-26 April 2012

7th
Mar
2012

A good time to investigate the secret wars in Greece and Turkey?

NATO Watch Comment

22nd
Feb
2012

Is Institutional Deception Being Practiced on a Grand Scale in Afghanistan?

A Review of ‘Dereliction of Duty II: Senior Military Leaders’ Loss of Integrity Wounds Afghan War Effort’ by Lt. Col. Daniel L. Davis

11th
Jan
2012

Iraqi Torture Scandal Touches Highest Levels of NATO

Source: Jeffrey Kaye, Truthout, 5 January

1st
Dec
2011

The hard lessons not learned by Canada

Original publication date: 
Wed, 11/16/2011 (All day)

The country was too hasty in jettisoning its former human security and peacekeeping agenda.

Ian Davis